Today our credit card debt alone totals over $11,000, but for the first time in a long time I fall asleep at night with hope rather than despair.   I’ve tried for over 2 years to get out debt but truth is we never made a dent in it.  It seems so obvious to me now why I’ve failed at getting our family debt.

One of the big reasons – I was unprepared and underfunded for the yearly bill/irregular bills when they came.   The fact that I never properly budgeted for the sewer bill or the car registration/inspection meant using credit cards or spending any “emergency savings” we had built up.   Basically back to square one.

Then I had an awesome idea that would revolutionize the personal finance world!    I would take all the irregular yearly bills, add them up, divide by 24 (my husband is paid bi-monthly) and make that part of my monthly budget.  I would call it our “Personal Escrow Account.”  GENIUS!

Of course this idea is old news.   In fact Charlotte, the subject of  an article at “Get Rich Slowly”, even calls her method a “Personal Escrow Account.”

While I won’t win any points for originality, this method has saved my budget and my sanity.  Breaking down big irregular bills into smaller semi-monthly payments not only makes me feel prepared but provides breathing room in the budget.

EXPENSES         YEARLY BILL         NEED TO SAVE per PAYCHECK

Sewer bill                        $204                                       $8.50

PreSchool                        $2430                                    $101.25

Cars(approx)                  $400                                      $16.70

Propane                            $1400                                    $58.35

These “mini-escrows”(I’m patenting that) have helped alleviate the pressure that would come any time a non-recurring bill would come due.  I round up the numbers to the nearest $5 and put them in designated ING accounts.  To build up the proper amounts I needed to borrow from the “Emergency Fund”.   I know, I know, YOU NEVER TOUCH the emergency fund but I would have had to either used the emergency fund to pay these bills or a credit card so what’s the difference?

I also add bi-monthly in sub ING accounts to the “Emergency Fund”, a “Christmas Fund” and a “Whatever Fund”.

When you NEED credit cards to pay bills you know you are in trouble.  That is where we were.  Hopefully, no more!  Over $11,000 in credit card debt is no joke, and while the amount we owe is still there I feel the crutch they provided may be gone.

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